IMBA Launches Dig In Fundraiser with Seven Mountain Bike Trail Projects


– Shimano and the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA)

Program Bridges the Gap Between Local and National Funding for MTB Trails

Shimano and the International Mountain Bicycling Association (IMBA) announce mountain bike trail projects that have been selected for the current Dig In fundraising period that runs July – September. IMBA Local Partner organizations are utilizing the Dig In platform to raise funds for projects that aim to expand trails and trail access in communities across the US. Each project will unlock a match from Shimano when it reaches $2,000 in online donations. Learn about the Dig In program or view Dig In projects on the IMBA website.

To be considered for the program, prospective Dig In projects must take place on public lands and result in substantial increase in access, improved mountain bike experiences, and greater community benefit. Community development, volunteer recruitment, new rider development, youth riding, engaging marginalized community members and furthering diversity, equity, and inclusion are all considered when selecting projects. “The IMBA team is so impressed by the Q1 2022 round of Dig In projects. They raised more funds than any Dig In round before — all nine projects received a $2,000 match from Shimano, and four met or exceeded their overall fundraising goal as well,” said David Wiens, IMBA Executive Director.  “That adds up to amazing progress for more trails close to home!” During the first quarter of 2022, Dig In successfully raised funds critical to build or revitalize a variety of trail projects, including state park trails, bike parks and skills areas across the US.  Since IMBA created Dig in in 2018: 89 applications have led to 32 grants and $501,000 of donations which have been leveraged to become $8.5 million in funding for local trail projects. Detailed planning can unlock critical funding for trail projects – the impact truly speaks for itself.

Summer 2022 Dig In Projects:

Fort Duffield Expansion – West Point, KY
Kentucky Mountain Bike Association (KyMBA) Louisville is raising funds to expand the Fort Duffield trail system by building new trails, adding and maintaining features, and reopening one section of the system. Fort Duffield has a little bit of everything – punchy climbs, steep descents, dirt jumps, scenic views, and a little bit of history. This former Civil War fort right by the Ohio and Salt Rivers has the potential to attract riders from all over the Midwest, spur economic growth in the town of West Point, and provide progression for riders looking to advance their skills.

Diversity in Mountain Biking Clinics – San Rafael, CA
Access4Bikes is working on growing the mountain biking community by offering free clinics to diverse and underserved communities in Marin County. Building on past successful clinics, the organization is doing targeted outreach to help riders of all backgrounds develop their mountain biking skills and learn why their voice matters in advocacy.

Nagel Middle School Bike Park – Anderson Township, OH
Cincinnati Off-Road Alliance (CORA) is raising funds to construct a mountain bike skills park in the Nagel Middle School campus. The skills park will provide an area for students to relieve stress, anxiety, and depression while improving their social and emotional health. The facilities and trail system will allow students to develop bike skills and challenge themselves physically and mentally. The park will also be open to the public outside school hours and serve as a practice site for the local NICA team.

Pine Knob Mountain Bike Park – Russellville, AR
Ozark Off Road Cyclists (OORC) created Pine Knob Mountain Bike Park in response to community demand for less intimidating beginner trails and, for those looking to advance their skills, rad jumps, exciting features, and progressive trails. Considering all the demands, River Valley Ozark Off Road Cyclists determined that a compact, well-designed skills park in the city was warranted to meet the community’s needs. The group found an old unmaintained city park within the city limits, located near an underprivileged community with no other park nearby.

Sapwi Flow Trail – Thousand Oaks, CA
Concerned Off-Road Bicyclists Association (CORBA) and Conejo Recreation and Park District (CRPD) partnered to create The Sapwi Flow Trail Project as an extension of the Sapwi Bike Park. The sense of community is strong at Sapwi, a welcoming space for local riders and visitors from outside the area. The addition of a flow trail will expand and enhance the Sapwi Bike Park experience for everyone and help get more kids on bikes! This bike skills park is open to the public and free for everyone.

Trails at Wiggins Community Center – Anniston, AL
Northeast Alabama Biking Association (NEABA) trail crew wants to expand the trails at Wiggins Community Center. The community center serves a mostly African American population and hosts after school and summer biking programs for kids. The long-range goal is to foster grass roots growth for the City of Anniston NICA team. This grant will fund building additional 2.5 miles of trails. The NEABA Trail Crew already completed a one mile loop that connects the community center with a nearby park.

CAMTB Pathways to Leadership Project (PTLP) – Statewide, California
California Mountain Biking Coalition (CAMTB) is working on statewide awareness and recruiting campaign to significantly increase diversity on the board of directors of California trail advocacy organizations. The Pathways to Leadership Project (PTLP) aims to ensure that the needs and perspectives of underrepresented riders in mountain biking are recognized and prioritized in outdoor advocacy.