Cruising Clearly: Top Benefits of Cycling with Contact Lenses


Cycling with Contact Lenses

Whether you’re a hobbyist or a competitive rider,

contact lenses can benefit you on the road

Cycling is an integral part of life for many of us. There’s nothing better than heading out for a ride on your favorite trail, but improper eyewear can ruin your trip as fast as a flat tire. So, how can you do your eyes the favor they deserve? Wearing contact lenses is your best bet for improving vision, enhancing safety, and experiencing the freedom to ride without worries wherever you are.

Better Vision

Good vision is essential during a ride. Whether you’re hitting a well-traveled trail or going out on a brand-new adventure, you need to see everything around you perfectly to feel confident on the road. As it turns out, contacts can help you do just that.

According to the CDC, contacts provide rock-solid peripheral vision so you can see from all angles. They also help with depth perception, allowing you to rapidly gauge distances between yourself and approaching objects. Since contacts sit directly on the eye instead of above it, they promote a free range of motion during sports. This enables you to swivel your head easily to keep track of passing animals, pedestrians, and cars.

As you can see, it can be beneficial for cyclists to keep a cache of contacts on hand. However, visiting the doctor each time you want a lens refill might cut into your riding time. Luckily, you can expedite the process by heading online to order your usual contact lenses without prescription verification from your optometrist. You’ll be able to skip the waiting room and save your precious time for biking.

Safer Riding

Not only do contacts allow you to see clearly, but they promote safety as well. Vision improvements allow riders to react more quickly to approaching obstacles, which can save you from losing control of the bike or crashing. If you do happen to crash, you don’t have to worry about your contacts breaking and there is no risk that your eyewear will injure you.

Additionally, contact lenses don’t fog up as the temperature changes throughout the day. There won’t be any condensation or steam obscuring your sight, so you’ll be able to keep track of your environment without visual impairments getting in the way. You also won’t need to remove your contacts to clean or wipe them off, eliminating unplanned and potentially hazardous pit stops along the road.

Another safety benefit of contacts is that they can reduce light distortions. Especially if you’re riding early in the morning or late at night, reflective glares from streetlights or headlights can be a big problem. These glares can disorient you, disrupting your vision and even causing momentary blindness in some cases. Since contacts aren’t reflective, they eliminate distortions and help you see clearly even during an influx of bright light.

More Freedom

 

Contacts give you the freedom to customize your apparel and use the gear you want.

Certain helmets, facemasks, and other cycling apparel can make rides infinitely more comfortable. However, non-contacts prescription lenses may be shaped in a way that isn’t compatible with your preferred gear or can be too bulky to fit under it. If you wear contact lenses, any equipment will work with your eyewear.

Not only will you be able to rock the latest and greatest gear in the cycling world, but you’ll get extra protection as well. You’ll have the freedom to toss on a pair of high-quality sunglasses for full-coverage UV protection or slip on some snow goggles for those freezing winter trips. The result? Contacts will help keep your eyes healthy, happy, and functional throughout the ride.

Can you see it clearly? Contacts are the way to go for cyclists who want to improve their riding experience. By choosing these easy, lightweight corrective lenses, you’ll be protecting yourself from the elements while improving your vision on the road. If you’re ready for a better cycling experience, go ahead and research contacts today.

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